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The Harvard Classics / Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf
collection
158
ITEMS
189,580
VIEWS
collection
eye 189,580
The Harvard Classics, originally known as Dr. Eliot's Five Foot Shelf, is a 51-volume anthology of classic works from world literature, compiled and edited by Harvard University president Charles W. Eliot and first published in 1909. The most comprehensive and well-researched anthology of all time comprises both the 50-volume "5-foot shelf of books" and the the 20-volume Shelf of Fiction. Together they cover every major literary figure, philosopher, religion, folklore and historical...
Crash Magazine Archive
collection
198
ITEMS
300,105
VIEWS
collection
eye 300,105
Crash was a magazine dedicated to the ZX Spectrum home computer. It was published from 1984 to 1991 by Newsfield Publications Ltd until their liquidation, and then until 1992 by Europress. Crash was initially launched in 1983 by Roger Kean, Oliver Frey and Franco Frey as a mail order software catalogue that included several pages of reviews. It then launched as a magazine in February 1984, maintaining its focus squarely on Spectrum gaming (unlike its competitors, which tended to feature more...
The Pulp Magazine Archive
collection
11,642
ITEMS
5.2M
VIEWS
collection
eye 5.2M
Pulp magazines (often referred to as "the pulps"), also collectively known as pulp fiction, refers to inexpensive fiction magazines published from 1896 through the 1950s. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges. The name pulp comes from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on better paper were called...
Your Sinclair Magazine
collection
93
ITEMS
177,856
VIEWS
collection
eye 177,856
Your Sinclair Magazine Issues 01-94 (January 1986 - September 1993. Your Sinclair was the successor to Your Spectrum, and focused on entertainment more than its predecessor. There's still a fair amount of technical content though, especially in the early issues. Towards the end of the magazine's life, it went straight for the "yoof" market, and as the Spectrum declined so did the page count.